90% of coronavirus patients experience side effects after recovery - here's what they are

Thursday, 1st October 2020, 12:16 pm
Updated Thursday, 1st October 2020, 12:16 pm
90% of coronavirus patients experience side effects after recovery - here's what they are
(Photo: Shutterstock)
90% of coronavirus patients experience side effects after recovery - here's what they are (Photo: Shutterstock)

A new online survey has found that 90 per cent of Covid-19 patients experience symptoms such as fatigue, loss of taste and smell, and psychological issues after recovery.

Conducted by the Korean Disease Control and Prevention Agency (KDCA), the online survey spoke with 965 recovered Covid-19 patients to examine the side effects of the virus. The KDCA said the study will soon be published with detailed analysis.

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Fatigue most common side effect

The preliminary results from the survey found that fatigue was the most commonly reported side effect, with 26.2 per cent of recovered patients experiencing tiredness, followed by difficulty in concentration, which was noticed by 24.6 per cent of people.

Other lingering effects included psychological or mental symptoms, and a loss of taste or smell.

The findings come as the global death toll from Covid-19 passed one million on 29 September.

‘Long Covid’

In August, a UK study found that almost three quarters of patients reported lasting symptoms of Covid-19 three months after recovering.

The study of 110 patients was carried out by North Bristol NHS Trust as part of its Discover project, which aims to identify the long term effects of the virus, which they call ‘Long Covid’.

A total of 81 out of 110 patients experienced symptoms that included breathlessness, excessive fatigue, and muscle aches, after 12 weeks.

Dr Rebecca Smith of the North Bristol NHS Trust said, “There's still so much we don't know about the long-term effects of coronavirus, but this study has given us vital new insight into what challenges patients may face in their recovery and will help us prepare for those needs.”