How to use our interactive Presidential Election result map

We’ve created an interactive state map to display the popular vote results for each state as they come in – here’s some background on how we will be using this graphic.

The states of play at 5.30am: compare this year's results to 2020 predictions and 2016's results through our interactive results map
The states of play at 5.30am: compare this year's results to 2020 predictions and 2016's results through our interactive results map

Keeping track of the results as they start to come in on US Presidential Election nights is always difficult, so we will be letting you know how a state has voted as soon as we do via our interactive presidential result map.

We will be updating our map to reflect how a candidate has performed in each state based on their share of the popular votes. So, when a state turns red on the map, this will show that it has been won by the incumbent candidate President Trump, and turning blue will confirm a state won for Democrat candidate Joe Biden.

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Of course, due to the pandemic and the slew of mail-in ballots used by Americans to vote in this year’s election, there will be delays in receiving many results.

States like Florida have announced their results tonight, but it is likely we will be kept waiting on results for states such as as Pennsylvania, who will be counting ballots for up to several days. You can find out more about when state by state results are expected to be reported here.

If you’d like to compare this year’s results with those of the 2016 Election or 2020 Projections, you can use the tabs located at the top right corner of the graphic to flick between different results. You can also see how many Electoral College votes a certain state has by hovering over it.

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