Coronavirus restrictions: Scottish residents urged not to cross border unless ‘essential’ amidst English Covid-19 lockdown

Almost two million people in north-east England are facing strict new rules.

Thursday, 17th September 2020, 6:06 pm
Updated Thursday, 17th September 2020, 6:26 pm
"Welcome to Scotland" sign at the Scotland/England border.  Picture: Getty Images.
"Welcome to Scotland" sign at the Scotland/England border. Picture: Getty Images.

Scottish Borders residents are being advised against all but essential travel across the border into neighbouring Northumberland after new restrictions were announced for the north east of England.

NHS Borders director of public health, Dr Keith Allan said travel is only recommended for “essential purposes such as school or work”.

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It comes as almost two million people in north-east England are set to be banned from mixing with other households and pubs will close early as coronavirus cases rise.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced the temporary restrictions will be in place from midnight due to "concerning rates of infection”.

In a joint media release from Scottish Borders Council and NHS Borders, Dr Allan said: “We are continuing to see increased numbers of cases of Covid-19 across the UK, with our neighbouring local authority area of Northumberland now facing restrictions on people mixing, and curfews in pubs.

“As a result we recommend that people in the Borders should only be travelling to Northumberland for essential purposes such as school or work, and they should be extra vigilant.”

The Health Secretary has released data showing Sunderland has an infection rate of 103 Cases per 100,000. In South Tyneside and Gateshead the latest rates were 93.4 and 83.6 respectively.

Cross-border travel, particularly to Berwick-upon-Tweed, takes place in the region on a daily basis.

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