Scotland are going to party like it's 1977 at Euro football tournament – Angus Robertson

No Scotland. No Party. Scotland is a nation transformed by the qualification victory over Serbia.

The Scotland players celebrate their Euros playoff triumph, just before getting stuck into Yes Sir, I Can Boogie (Picture: Srdjan Stevanovic/Getty Images)
The Scotland players celebrate their Euros playoff triumph, just before getting stuck into Yes Sir, I Can Boogie (Picture: Srdjan Stevanovic/Getty Images)

After two decades of failed football qualification campaigns, Scotland is going to the Euros and boy are we going to party.

If you need a wee reminder how fantastic the reaction was across the country, the Scottish national team has helpfully released a compilation video of fans watching the decisive penalty save that catapulted to success.

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Adults, children and pets can be seen euphorically celebrating unable to contain their happiness and perhaps disbelief as well. Take a look at the video, it will make your day.

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Not only has Scotland got the monkey off the back, but a new anthem has been born. Thirty-three years after “Yes Sir, I can Boogie” became the biggest-selling single of all-time by a female group, Scotland has resuscitated the careers of Spanish vocal duo Baccara.

After their victory, the Scotland players were filmed singing the 1970s hit, and have spawned a series of live versions of the song online and propelled the original track back to the top of the charts. An offer has already been made to record the song with the team.

Two of Scotland’s three Euros matches next year will take place at Hampden and hopefully, Covid restrictions permitting, fans will be able to attend.

Opposition supporters from the Czech Republic and Croatia will be blown away by the warm welcome to Scotland, the exuberance of the Tartan Army, the stadium roar and the singing of a 1977 disco classic. No Scotland. No Party.

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