Here's how to reduce your screen time during lockdown - from time limits to walking

With Scotland currently under varying coronavirus restrictions, Northern Ireland nearing the end of a four-week second lockdown and England just at the start of one, people may find themselves spending more and more time in front of screens.

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Working from home in front of a computer screen during the day, and then unwinding during the cold nights by watching television or scrolling on your phone, may see you racking up more screen time than you’d like.

But there are certain things you can do to make sure you don’t spend too much time in front of a screen.

How to reduce time spent in front of a screen

There are numerous ways you can cut down on screen time, according to Hugo Tilmouth, CEO of hospitality innovations company, ChargedUp.

Mr Tilmouth said, “We live in a world where we rely on our mobiles for multiple functions beyond communication - including for payment devices, directions, streaming music, films and television shows - to name a few.”

These are a few examples of how you can reduce your screen time.

Try the 20-20-20 rule

If you’re getting symptoms of eye strain from spending a lot of time in front of a screen, then looking away at something that is 20 feet away from you for a total of 20 seconds after you have spent 20 minutes at a screen, can be really helpful.

Head out for a walk

Going out for a stroll during your lunch break may provide you with a much-needed break from your screen and allow you to clear your mind. Heading out for some fresh air will not only give your eyes a break, but it will also release your endorphins and lift your mood.

Download a screen-time-specific app

There are a variety of apps which you can download in order to help you take breaks from your screen and by introducing small changes in your habits. These apps also sometimes offer guided coaching on how to disconnect from your screens.

Set time limits on your phone

It’s said that avoiding reaching for your phone first thing in the morning is the best way to start your day. Instead, you can look to begin your day by being present and set yourself challenges by allocating a set time, e.g. 10am to check your phone.