Protect Scotland App: almost 60% of covid positive app users do not inform close contacts they have the virus

Figures obtained by BBC Scotland show that only 42% of Protect Scotland app users who test positive are inputting the necessary code to ensure close contacts, who also use the app, get notified.

Only 42% of covid positive Protect Scotland app users are entering the code to ensure close contacts are notified (Photo: John Devlin).
Only 42% of covid positive Protect Scotland app users are entering the code to ensure close contacts are notified (Photo: John Devlin).

Freedom of Information figures from 10 December reveal that 27,239 codes had been issued to users that tested positive, however, only 11,549 users inputted the codes which informs close contacts to self isolate.

The Scottish Government has said that the Protect Scotland app is to ensure people at risk can take steps to reduce the risk of infecting others, however, recent figures revealed by the BBC show that lack of user input is stifling this process.

Sign up to our public interest bulletins - get the latest news on the Coronavirus

Sign up to our public interest bulletins - get the latest news on the Coronavirus

The Protect Scotland App was designed to ensure that those who test positive for the virus can inform close contacts, including those who they do not know, via bluetooth, provided that they have the app.

When someone tests positive for the virus, during an interview with a contact tracer, they are asked whether they have the app and if they do they are sent a six-digit code which they should enter which will inform anyone who has been in close contact with them.

Without entering this code, which many users are not doing, no-one will be informed.

A Scottish Government Spokesperson told the BBC: “The upload success rate is consistent with other nations who use similar technology and contact tracing apps.”

The Government is encouraging as many people as possible to upload their test result codes, saying that the figures include repeat requests for test codes.

They also said the app is an “extra tool” in the contact tracing process.

A message from the Editor:Thank you for reading this article. We're more reliant on your support than ever as the shift in consumer habits brought about by Coronavirus impacts our advertisers.

If you haven't already, please consider supporting our trusted, fact-checked journalism by taking out a digital subscription.