LiveNicola Sturgeon LIVE: Coronavirus briefing led by First Minister ahead of review of restriction levels

Follow here for all coronavirus updates from Scotland, the UK and around the world.

Monday saw 717 new cases confirmed in Scotland.

1,227 people are in hospital and 98 were in intensive care.

Sign up to our public interest bulletins - get the latest news on the Coronavirus

Sign up to our public interest bulletins - get the latest news on the Coronavirus

There were tragically six more deaths.

A message from the Editor:Thank you for reading this article. We're more reliant on your support than ever as the shift in consumer habits brought about by Coronavirus impacts our advertisers.

If you haven't already, please consider supporting our trusted, fact-checked journalism by taking out a digital subscription.

Coronavirus in Scotland LIVE: Follow here for all Monday's updates
Coronavirus in Scotland LIVE: Follow here for all Monday's updates

Coronavirus in Scotland LIVE: Follow here for all of Monday’s updates

Last updated: Monday, 16 November, 2020, 12:49

  • The Prime Minister is currently self isolating after being in contact with an MP who has tested positive. 
  • Covid scientists have predicted normality to return to the UK by next winter. 
  • John Swinney has said that Level 4 lockdown in Scotland is ‘not inevitable’. 

FM: Scotland has the lowest prevalence of all of the four nations.

FM: “Things are not getting worse in Scotland...we are actually seeing a stabilisation”

Coronavirus in Scotland: 101 new cases in the Lothians as country records 717 cases and 6 deaths in 24 hours

Coronavirus in Scotland: 6 new deaths as country records 717 cases in 24 hours

The First Minister has said that she will lay out a time line for an independence referendum when they release their manifesto, but refuses to talk more about it at a coronavirus briefing.

Coronavirus in Scotland: Second Covid-19 vaccine is over 90% effective in early trials

A second Covid-19 vaccine candidate has reported very high efficacy levels in early trials, just days after an announcement of success from Pfizer and BioNTech.

Jeane Freeman: New framework to give guidance for clinically prioritising care for non covid cases.

A ‘clear and realistic’ expectation for patients on when they will receive care. 

FM asks again that people stick to the rules and restrictions in their area.

FM will address parliament tomorrow afternoon on latest restriction updates.

FM: Some area’s staying ‘stubbornly high’.

This rises concerns about the pressure on the NHS in these regions. 

It also means that there is less flexibility over Christmas. 

Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow are the location for three new testing hubs, on track to open before the end of the year.

These will increase daily testing capacity to “at least 65,000”. 

Care Homes will be given at least 2 Ipads to allow remote consultations as well as residents keeping in touch with family.

Ipads not a replacement for routine visits. 

Scottish Government update: 717 new positive cases, 1,227 patients in hospital, 98 patients in intensive care and tragically, 6 more people have died after testing positive.

Amnesty International has said authorities in Belgium “abandoned” thousands of elderly people who died in nursing homes during the coronavirus pandemic.

Amnesty International has said authorities in Belgium "abandoned" thousands of elderly people who died in nursing homes during the coronavirus pandemic following an investigation that described the situation as involving "human rights violations".

One of the hardest-hit countries in Europe, Belgium has reported more than 531,000 confirmed coronavirus cases and more than 14,400 deaths linked to the outbreak.

During the first wave of the pandemic in spring, the nation of 11.5 million people recorded a majority of its virus-related deaths in nursing homes.

Between March and October, Amnesty International said "a staggering" 61.3% of all Covid-19 deaths in Belgium took place in nursing homes. The group said authorities were not quick enough in implementing measures to protect nursing home residents and staff during this period, failing to protect their human rights.

Amnesty International said one of the reasons so many people died in homes is because infected residents were not transferred to hospitals to receive treatment.

"The results of our investigation allow us to affirm that (care homes) and their residents were abandoned by our authorities until this tragedy was publicly denounced and the worst of the first phase of the pandemic was over," said Philippe Hensmans, the director of Amnesty International Belgium.

When the virus struck Europe hard in March, Belgium was caught off-guard and unprepared, faced with a critical shortage of personal protective equipment.

As infections surged across the country, nursing homes were quickly overwhelmed by the frenetic pace of contamination as local authorities even requested the help of Belgian armed forces to cope.

Belgium had one of the highest death rates worldwide during the first wave. But while nursing home staff were overwhelmed, the country's hospitals weathered the crisis, as their intensive care units never reached their 2,000-bed capacity.

Page 1 of 2
 0 comments

Want to join the conversation? Please or to comment on this article.